Sunday, December 03, 2006

This was sent to me from a friend. I don't know who the author is but I thought it was so wonderful, that I just had to share it.



I don't think our kids know what an apron is. The principal use of grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath, but along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven. It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears. From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven. When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids. And when the weather was cold, grandma wrapped it around her arms. Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove. Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron. From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees. When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds. When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner. It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that old-time apron" that served so many purposes.

4 comments:

J. Andrew Lockhart said...

This is really nice -- brings back good memories. :)

granniepat said...

Can you imagine. I even wiped tears and noses caught sneezes. then to the hen house to get the eggs,Visited the Out door biffy. No running water to wash hands in. Maybe the apron was used.This same contaminated apron went on to bake and wipe pastry hands and continued to roll pastry. The germs that were spread in the name of love. Good thing that pastry was cooked in the oven to banish the germs. I remember my aunt rubbing homemade cake lye soap on every piece of clothing as she scrubbed them on the wash board. That sure got the germs out. Later she got a motorized washing machine. Shestill wet each article of clothing and rubbed it down with lye soap before putting it in the washing machine. Only soap they had Or the cheapest.

Imran MD said...

Thanks for sharing this. A symbol of warm and caring feeling from something so common such as an apron... past the hygiene as GranniePat has mentioned.

Jen said...

I agree with the others. Cute post but actually really gross and unsanitary. ;)